Effect on mechanical properties and stress strain characteristics of normal and high strength concrete at elevated temperature

  • Vikas Patel National Council for Cement and Building Materials, 34, KM Stone, Delhi Mathura Road, NH-2, Ballabgarh, Haryana
  • Brijesh Singh National Council for Cement and Building Materials, 34, KM Stone, Delhi Mathura Road, NH-2, Ballabgarh, Haryana
  • P N Ojha National Council for Cement and Building Materials, 34, KM Stone, Delhi Mathura Road, NH-2, Ballabgarh, Haryana.
  • B N Mohapatra National Council for Cement and Building Materials, 34, KM Stone, Delhi Mathura Road, NH-2, Ballabgarh, Haryana.
Keywords: High strength concrete (HSC), Stress Strain Characteristics, Spalling of concrete, Polypropylene fiber

Abstract

High strength concrete (HSC) has some disadvantages such as brittleness and poor resistance to fire. Fire exposure affects the concrete in way that the disintegration of concrete starts and a severe surface spalling occurs at very high temperatures. Therefore, the structural behaviour or response to the load will change after fire exposure and the structural members may not behave as they were designed. Further, the basics of flexural design depend on the stress- strain response of the concrete which is also affected upon fire exposure. Hence, this study is carried out to provide useful input to aid the provision of a fire resistance for structural behaviour of concrete by investigating the effects on mechanical properties of concrete after exposure to high temperatures up to 600°C and establishing a stress-strain relationship. The concrete cylinders of size 100 mm x 200 mm were exposed to the temperature of 2000C, 4000C and 6000C after which the residual compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength were recorded. For stress strain characteristics, 100 × 200 mm cylinders with polypropylene fiber content of 0.5% by volume of concrete were subjected to temperature exposure of 6000C for durations of 1 hour. Curves for reduction factors of strength and stress strain characteristics after fire/elevated temperature exposure has been established. Just consideration of reduced strength for assessment after fire exposure will not serve the purpose as the change in load response and increased deformation capacity also needs to be addressed properly.

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Published
2020-10-12
How to Cite
Patel, V., Singh, B., Ojha, P. N., & Mohapatra, B. N. (2020). Effect on mechanical properties and stress strain characteristics of normal and high strength concrete at elevated temperature. Journal of Building Materials and Structures, 7(2), 199-209. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4077425
Section
Original Articles